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Ann Arbor District Library


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I stayed an extra day after i-Conference 2006 so I could visit the downtown branch of the Ann Arbor District Library (AADL) last 18 October 2006. I had begun to realize that North Americans are not as camera-happy as Filipinos, so I asked for permission to take pictures of the library from the director. And that's why there are hardly any people in the photos =)

AADL's website was cited by the American Library Association (ALA) as the best library website for libraries with budgets of $6M or more. But it was Jenny Levine's reference to it as "The Perfect Library Blog Example" that convinced me that I had to go see the library that has so involved its community, it has a Superpatron who gets invited to speak about his experience as a user at library conferences.

As its category in ALA's annual awards suggests, AADL has money. But could it be that they were able to "buy" their community's support? I don't think so. Leadership must have had something to do with it.


Category: Libraries

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Yale University Library


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I got to visit the Yale University Library because I met Rich Richie, curator of Yale's Southeast Asia Collection, when he bought some books from PCIJ while I was still working there. As with just about every librarian I meet, I introduced myself and thought, "Well, maybe we'll meet again someday."

In this case, "someday" came sooner than expected when I learned that a former classmate was working in New Haven, and an editor I met at the SSP Annual Meeting gave me a third reason to pass by New Haven, CT, on my way back to Boston from New York.

I was amazed at the depth of Yale's Philippine collection, but it would not be until I got to Toronto—and learned that many of the books I was borrowing via inter-library loan were from Yale—that I realized that I will eventually have to go back and spend more than just a day looking around.

Rich also introduced me to other Filipinos in the Yale library system, including Edith Baradi, who I would later realize is the author of a bibliography important for my own research. Edith then introduced me to one of her fellow librarians, who showed off her Philippine-made bag when she learned I was Filipino.

Finally, I was under the impression that Yale's Sterling Memorial Library was a church converted into a library, but according to the brief history on the website, it was actually built and designed to be a library.

The photos were taken on 3 August 2006.


Category: Libraries

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Baruch College's Newman Library


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During my first week in the United States last June 2006, I got an email from Stephen Francoeur, another blogger, that demonstrated just how blogging can be useful as a networking tool. Apparently, he'd noticed that I had just arrived in his country, and offered to take me around his library in case I passed by New York. He added, "Having been to the Philippines once and having received a very gracious welcome from everyone I met, I'd like to return that favor." And that's how I came to visit the Newman Library on 28 July 2006.

I had not heard of Baruch College before, and did not know that it had been at the top of the list of "the most ethnically diverse institutions of higher education in the United States" (US News & World Report) for the past eight years, so I was pleasantly surprised to find a Philippine flag on the library's premises. And then there was the counter where students borrowed laptops (!), which just blew my mind. Computers may be used on the premises in libraries in the Philippines, but I don't know of any that actually lend more than a hundred of them to students. For free!

It was a very short visit, so I did not get to meet Stephen's Filipino-American wife, but since I hope to go back to New York City in the next few years, maybe our paths will eventually cross. Incidentally, Stephen has been a victim of plagiarism. See his post entitled, "My bit role in a Wikipedia soap opera."


Category: Libraries

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Boston Public Library


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The photos above were taken at the Boston Public Library's Central Library in Copley Square, Boston, MA, on three separate days from 7 July to 8 August 2006.

What I found most striking about the BPL was its Tagalog collection, about half of which was made up of romances. I tried to find out what the circulation patterns were, but this was not readily available. I was told that I would find other Filipinos (i.e., nurses) at hospitals, but except for one former classmate, I didn't run into any other Filipinos. So I don't really know whether the romances were acquired to fill an expressed need.

Something else worth mentioning is that it was with BPL that I was first able to ask an online reference question via its "Ask A Librarian" service—even without a library card. Those with library cards can even access databases—from anywhere around the world—just by inputting their library card numbers.

The photo of the map in "Islands Philippines" is from the Journeys of the Imagination exhibit, which can now be viewed online, of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center.


Category: Libraries

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FO: The Influence of Jose Rizal

Rizal Day, a national holiday in the Philippines, is commemorated every December 30, when Jose Rizal was executed 110 years ago.

Rizal is probably the best known Filipino who has been killed because of what he wrote. Unlike the Filipino journalists whose deaths have turned the Philippines into the most dangerous place after Iraq for press people, Rizal was actually "tried" for his "crime"—writing about Spanish abuses in the Philippines, primarily in Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo.

The following video from Filipiniana.net provides a flavor of the effect of Rizal's work:



The same video also indicates the puzzle that was Rizal's influence on his countrymen, most of whom could not read Rizal's works in Spanish. It must be noted, too, that only 2,000 copies of each of the books were printed in Europe, and that perhaps half made it to Philippine shores. And yet, according to Sichrovsky,

these thousand copies exerted an explosive effect, were of decisive influence and changed as no other event had, the course of Philippine history at the end of the nineteenth century.
Noli Me Tangere literally means "touch me not," but has been translated as The Social Cancer and The Lost Eden. El Filibusterismo (subversion), meanwhile, has appeared as The Reign of Greed and The Subversive.


Categories: Filipiniana Online, Events

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FO: Himig Heswita's
"How Lovely is Your Dwelling Place"



How Lovely is Your Dwelling Place
Lyrics and music by: Arnel Aquino, SJ
Performed by: RB Hizon, SJ, and Himig Heswita

There is a Reason for the season.

It's always good to remember that Jesus Christ was not born in a hospital. He did not receive gifts from Santa Claus, either.

Merry Christmas!


Categories: Religion, Filipiniana Online

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Get Caught Reading


via Beatriz

The National Book Development Board (NBDB) has adopted the Association of American Publishers' Get Caught Reading campaign. While I applaud the intention, I am afraid that unless they do a better job of promoting it, it's going to come and go without the impact that Visine's Read to Lead campaign had. (Note: I know, I know. Visine had money but dropped the campaign after gaining market share. Let's not go there.)

Here's what NBDB has to show for its efforts after a few weeks:
Department of Education Advisory No. 214 s.2006 (pdf)
Miriam Quiambao gets caught reading (NBDB)
Super Inggo gets caught reading (NBDB)
'Get Caught Reading' campaign launched (Manila Bulletin, 10 December 2006)
What about the poster above? What about it? I found that poster on a blog, not the usability-challenged NBDB website. More photos are available on the Super Inggo blog. So am I just going to whine about this? Nope. It's quite clear that we can't just rely on NBDB to promote its own campaign. Super Inggo and Beatriz have shown the way.

Get Caught Reading

I'll be making my own poster soon and will put it on my blog. I hope you can do the same. If you don't have time, why not put the Get Caught Reading logo—which NBDB doesn't even use—on your blog? Here's the code:
<a href="http://www.getcaughtreading.org/"><img src="http://static.flickr.com/140/327802814_18dcea78d6_o.gif"></a>
At this point, the code links to the original—and very American—Get Caught Reading website. But until NBDB comes up with a page worth linking to, this will have to do.

Bloggers unite!

Category: Education

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Librarian Beats Other Professionals

by Rizchelle F. Sampang
Note from vonjobi: Zchel will be leaving for the United States in 2007 as part of the Rotary Foundation's Group Study Exchange program, which is not solely for librarians. The text, with minor changes, is hers. The title is mine =)
Rizchelle F. SampangThis is where it all started. I received this email and immediately inquired about the said group study exchange program. Then, I was told to send my resume to Mr. Mario Magat of the Rotary Club of Alabang and I did.

I learned more about the Rotary Group Study Exchange (GSE) from graduates of the program, by reading articles about it, and from the rotary club’s web site (www.rotary.org). The more I got information about the program, the more I wanted to become part of it.
The first interview was last November 15, 2006, held at the Makati Sports Club. After the panel interview, we were asked to pass the official Rotary GSE application form with the essay of intent. The week after the first panel interview, Rotary called, on the day itself, for the final interview. It was conducted again at the Makati Sports Club. I was the last person to arrive, as I was also on the first interview, because I came from work at De La Salle Santiago Zobel in Alabang. There were twelve applicants, including myself and three panelists. I was shocked with the fact that I was competing with a doctor, an engineer, three lawyers, etc.

I was quietly thinking what could be the question. After the second to the last applicant answered, the question was thrown at me. I answered and we were dismissed. I was not expecting to receive any email nor a text message from Rotary, as I thought I failed to present my profession in front of the other eleven young professionals vying for a slot on any of the two group study exchange programs and three panelists.

Sunday, November 26, 2006, I was on my way home from Baclaran when I fortunately received a text message from one of the panelists saying that I am one of the US Team Finalists. I was with two of my closest friends and my boyfriend that day. I couldn’t believe what I read. I read it three times and asked my friend to read it for me. And yes, my first name—correctly spelled—was in it.

This will be my first time to travel and I am so proud to be an ambassador of Filipino librarians. I believe that this program will help me in building more libraries, like the Bulacan Library Project that I am currently working on as a volunteer librarian, and in creating efficient library services and programs by giving me a chance to visit libraries and observe library services and programs in California. After four weeks (April 29, 2007-May 27, 2007) of staying outside the country, I will be certainly back with added experience and knowledge that I will be more than willing to share with my fellow librarians.

As I am writing this article, I remembered a Canadian library science student who once asked the question: "What do you think is the biggest challenge in library development (i.e., in getting more libraries to be built in the Philippines and adequate collections development, etc.) besides the lack of public funding, what other reasons are there?" I answered, "We need more librarians who will get out of their comfort zones and act in making the realization of information equity happen."


Category: Librarians

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FO: Bukas Palad's "Humayo't Ihayag"



Humayo't Ihayag
Lyrics: Manoling Francisco, SJ, Johnny Go, SJ, and Louie Catalan, SJ
Music: Manoling Francisco, SJ
Performed by: Bukas Palad

In the spirit of the season, watch the video of this song and reflect on the fact that although it's not really a Christmas song, there is so much joy in it that it gets sung a lot during Christmas. The lyrics below are from the Bukas Palad website. The translation is mine.

HUMAYO'T IHAYAG
Humayo't ihayag (Purihin Siya!)
At ating ibunyag (Awitan Siya!)
Pagliligtas ng Diyos na sa krus ni Hesus
Ang Siyang sa mundo'y tumubos

KORO:
Langit at lupa, Siya'y papurihan
Araw at tala, Siya'y parangalan
Ating 'pagdiwang pag-ibig ng Diyos sa tanan
Aleluya

Halina't sumayaw (Buong bayan!)
Lukso sabay sigaw (Sanlibutan!)
Ang ngalan Niyang angkin singningning ng bituin
Liwanag ng Diyos sumaatin (KORO)

At isigaw sa lahat
Kalinga Niya'y wagas
Kayong dukha't salat
Pag-ibig Niya sa inyo ay tapat
GO FORTH AND PROCLAIM
Go forth and proclaim (Praise Him!)
And let us reveal (Sing to Him!)
God's salvation on the cross of Christ
Who redeemed the world

CHORUS:
Heaven and earth, praise Him
Sun and stars, glorify Him
Let us celebrate God's love for everyone
Alleluia

Come let's dance (The whole nation!)
Jump and shout (The universe!)
The name He owns is as bright as a star
God's light is with us (CHORUS)

And shout it to everyone
His love is pure
You who are poor and needy
His love for you is steadfast

Categories: Religion, Filipiniana Online

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SLA, Toronto, and PhD or
How a Conference Changed My Life

The SLA Business and Finance Division is again offering an International Travel Award so that "a business information professional from a developing country" can attend the 2007 SLA Annual Conference, in Denver, Colorado, from 3-6 June 2007.

Take note, they're not necessarily looking for librarians. So if you happen to be working in a business-related special library (e.g., PSE, SEC, ADB) or a business school library (e.g., AIM, UP, DLSU), why not apply? Who knows, it might change your life. That's what happened to me.

A few months ago, someone on a listserv that I belong to asked about what those in the group thought of library conferences. Her last question was, "Did it change your life?" And that got me thinking. Here is what I wrote:
last year i was able to attend my first-ever library conference in toronto through an international travel grant from SLA's B&F division (i'm from the philippines and got my MLIS in 2004). and because two other newcomers to the toronto conference weren't around to claim their free registration for this year's conference in baltimore, my name got picked in the raffle.

when i got back to manila, i knew i wouldn't have money to go back this year even though i had free registration. i didn't think it was likely that another SLA division would give me another travel grant, so i kept my eyes open and saw that the society for scholarly publishing was looking for applicants for its conference in annapolis just a week before the SLA one in baltimore. i applied for it and got it.

the SSP and SLA conferences were good not just for networking but the content. SSP was exactly right for me because i had some online and offline publishing experience on the side, and open access was a big thing at the conference, which was smaller than SLA's. in contrast, SLA was so huge that i had to spend more time choosing the sessions i wanted to attend. but since this was my second year, it felt good to see familiar faces. there was also an informal get-together for bloggers, and that was just great.

now i'm back in toronto where i just started my phd, for which i have a fellowship and which i looked into last year while i was here for the toronto conference. just a few hours ago i was talking to stephen abram, SLA president-elect, who was very nice and whom i never thought i'd be able to chat with for more than two seconds. well, he ended up giving me some very useful advice over about twenty minutes regarding my phd AND winter in toronto.

lessons learned: apply for grants, get to know people at the conference, keep in touch, keep learning, and sometimes the stars align just right...

i'm planning to go to more conferences as a student, and avail of the cheaper membership and conference rates. but i'm going to keep on applying for grants, too.

going back to the last of the questions in the original email—"Did it change your life?"—it sure did.

Category: About Vonjobi

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FO: Philippine Star's Archives

After a long, long time, the Archives link of Philippine Star is working. It seems to be so new that the search engines haven't spidered anything beyond 2006.

The calendar links to dates from 1 January 2000 to 31 (?!) December 2006, but unfortunately, the first week of January 2000 and the entire August 2000 display the following message: "SORRY! No Archive For This Date."

Someone needs to teach their webmaster about netiquette—s/he needs to stop using CAPS to SHOUT at readers. But hey, it took YEARS before they put up their Archives, so I shouldn't keep my hopes up =)

The following are the more significant articles from Philippine Star that I have linked to in the past:

Edsa 20/20: Fatigues

Coup season by Scott R. Garceau (5 March 2006)
More on Library Hub
3 in 4 recent elementary grad can’t read by Sandy Araneta (6 November 2005)
Consal XIII and Publishers
Book of Summer Reading by Juaniyo Y. Arcellana (15 May 2005)

Category: Filipiniana Online

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Jose Escarilla — Filipino Librarian

A Filipino librarian has been featured in the November 2006 issue of SLA's Information Outlook. The full text of the article and the accompanying sidebars are reprinted in full below with permission. (Note: It's actually four pages long, with three photos, so this is not a short write-up.)

I first met Jose Escarilla at SLA's annual conference in Toronto last year (see SLA 2005). Actually, to be more precise, he found me.

I am quoted in the article as saying that, "Jose is very accommodating... When he found out that I was attending this year’s conference in Baltimore, he told me that I could join him in his hotel room if I didn’t have any place to stay." Due perhaps to space limitations, the whole story was not told. Here's the rest of the email and photo I sent to the article's author:
but i already had a place to stay, so i had to decline.

and then i had difficulty finding a place to stay in arlington, where i was attending another conference. this time i asked jose, and he referred me to jim arshem, who very willingly took me in.

finally widharto, an indonesian whom i also met on the same day i met jose last year, asked me if i knew anyone with whom he could stay in baltimore, so i forwarded his email to jose.

attached is a photo i took in baltimore. jose hosted jim and widharto in his hotel room. from left: widharto, jim, jose.
Widharto, Jim Arshem, Jose Escarilla

Jose G. Escarilla Jr.

Joined SLA: 1976
Job Title: Corporate Librarian
Employer: General Electric Company
Experience: 38 years
Education: University of the East, Philippines, major, library science; Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N.Y., MLS
First Job: Student assistant at the University of the East Library, Philippines

Biggest challenge: “In the late 1990’s, GE required every exempt employee to complete two projects to be ‘greenbelt’ certified. It was a nightmare to come up with 2 projects but I survived and got my greenbelt certificate.”
Other activities: GE volunteer (Habitat for Humanity, literacy program, etc.); marathon runner (about 60 as of press time); ballroom dancer; tennis player; world traveler


A Retiring Info Pro Looks Back on His Career—and Ahead to…
More Marathons to Come

By Forrest Glenn Spencer

Jose G. Escarilla Jr. has been called a brat, Good Samaritan, troublemaker, spoiled, a global freeloader, Jose Loco, and a survivor.

And that’s just from his friends and associates.

On December 22, SLA member Escarilla will be called something else: retired. After nearly 40 years as a corporate librarian (the last 21 years with the General Electric Company) and a day before his 60th birthday, Escarilla will depart the GE corporate offices in Fairfield, Connecticut, and see what new challenges he can tackle. He has many accomplishments: marathon running, singing, ballroom dancing, tennis, and extensive volunteering. Upon retirement, his new endeavor will be that of a full-time world traveler.

“Most of my friends are surprised that I am retiring early,” Escarilla said. “Life is too short and I actually was given a projection of 25 years to live. I am in perfect health. I might have aches and pains, but that is part of aging. My passion in life is to see the world. With my resources and resourcefulness, I think I can do it as long as I have a fairly good and healthy life.”

Some wanted Escarilla to stay, but he felt it was time to move on. There were changes occurring at GE with new management, and he believed the timing was best.

“One of my dreams in life was to be a millionaire when I retire,” Escarilla added. “But my health is important to me, so it’s okay that I didn’t become a millionaire. I have had several operations. I am a survivor in all that I do. When I run in marathons, it’s not about the time but that I finish the race.”

He was born in Sipocot, Camarines Sur, Bicol Province, Philippines, in 1946 and raised and educated in a middle-class family where he helped his parents with their variety store and restaurant. But he has always been independent minded and free spirited. His drive has been his interest and ambitions.

To Escarilla, nothing seemed impossible. Upon completion of college at the University of the East, Philippines, with a major in library science, his first job was working as a student assistant in the university library. His first job as a corporate librarian was in the technical library at Philippines Airlines (PAL). He felt lucky to secure this job because he was told that people were not hired at PAL without knowing anyone on “the inside,” and he knew no one. He applied blindly.

“Basically my job was answering questions about the airlines for the mechanics and engineers,” he said. “We were also responsible for laminating the manuals because the mechanics’ hands are very dirty and the materials are used and read constantly. The manuals had to be protected so we laminated everything.” There were five people on the library staff. Escarilla learned that one of the benefits at PAL after two years of service was a free international ticket. So he decided to move to the US. “To work in the Philippines, you make no money, the income is minimal. Without working at PAL, I wouldn’t have been able to come to here. I have always had opportunities in my life, all the time. I was thankful to that job so I could come to the U.S.A.”

On the Job

Escarilla’s attraction to the information profession was out of necessity rather than love-at-first-library. “When I was in the Philippines I liked working,” he said in his still-accented English. “It was very easy to find work in libraries. In my first year in college, I was living with this professor and he told me I could always find work in the library as a student assistant. This was my introduction to librarianship and why I have a B.S. in library science.”

His talents for the profession emerged, and he began to develop his skills. “Librarianship is like detective work to me,” he added. “I found it interesting to find information. I still do, even today. It’s an intriguing part of my life, finding information all the time. That’s how I see librarianship.”

In 1970, after two years at PAL, he requested a free ticket to America. He had three plans: find permanent shelter, find work, and find an immigration lawyer to begin the process of becoming a U.S. citizen. He received his green card in 1975 and became a naturalized citizen in 1980.

“When I came to the U.S., I had two friends; and I stayed with them for a few months,” Escarilla said. “I am resourceful in making friends and networking. I’m very open to people. I always like to expand my horizons, even now. I say hello to everyone. I remember my son, when he was very small would ask, ‘Daddy – do you know them?’ And I say no, and he asked, ‘Why did you say hello to them?’ and I said, ‘I just say hello – what’s wrong with that?’

“That’s what I do, whether I’m in Poland or in Istanbul. I say hello, and people just look at me. They’re not used to it, and that’s why I make friends and meet people; I just talk.”

Escarilla joined a Philippine folk dance group and a singing group soon after arriving in the U.S. That’s where he met his wife—and had his fifteen-minutes of fame in performances at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., and the Lincoln Center in New York City.

Once, the dance group and the singing group both were performing at the same time. “I was the only member who belonged to both groups. I got satisfaction performing in front of the elderly people in the hospitals and promoting the Philippine culture.”

Finding his first job in the United States was difficult. Through a job posting at the Columbia University Library School, he was hired as a bindery assistant at the New York Academy of Medicine Library. During his two years there, he studied for his master’s at night and graduated with an MLS in 1973 from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn.

Escarilla found several more jobs during the next 12 years, and his network of friends and associates expanded. One networking opportunity led him to a lunch with then-GE librarian Rose Mancini in 1985. “When she told me that she was going to retire, I told her that I would like to apply for the job,” Escarilla recalled. “Through extensive interviews, including with a vice president, I was hired as a corporate librarian [in the] business development department. I liked my job because I was asked to get information on companies that we would like to merge with or buy. If we bought the company, we always had a big celebration.”

It wasn’t long before Escarilla became the administrator of the Library Research Center, which had access to information on more than 6 million American businesses, continuous investment analyses on more than 1,700 businesses, the annual reports of 900 companies, and access to over 100 publications. Then, as now, employees were encouraged to visit the center and use the information.

A Keeper

Escarilla’s access to the data grew over the years, but the corporate environment began change. The recession of the early 1990s took its toll. Businesses cut jobs, streamlined operations, and introduced multi-tasking into the employees’ standard of performance. In 1992, GE merged its six libraries to form the Corporate Information Research Center (CIRC) as part of the Real Estate Service Operation with a staff of nine. Two years later, GE decided to outsource CIRC to then Teltech (now Guideline).

“If they outsourced the library, then I would have no control with that,” Escarilla said. “But then one day the vice president called me to his office. I was very nervous at that moment. I was not sure of what was going to happen to me. As soon as I arrived at the door, I greeted him with, ‘Hi Ed, are you going to give me a pink slip?’

“I knew that it was a very bold statement, but I wanted to be direct. He smiled and told me to sit down... I was relieved when he told me that two of the nine people would remain as GE employees and I was one of them.”

Escarilla never knew why he was chosen to stay over the other librarians—and he never asked, he said with a laugh. “My thinking is because maybe Jack was involved in the decision, and I know Jack.” Jack, being Jack Welch, then the GE chairman and chief executive officer. Escarilla’s office was in the same building as Welch’s, two floors directly below the chairman’s. Escarilla had been featured extensively in the corporate newsletter, and he believes Welch read those newsletters. “I think Jack liked to see those kind of outstanding employees, and probably that’s why I stayed.” When Welch left GE, he held a farewell party with only 150 people in attendance. Escarilla was one of the invited guests.

Today, Escarilla is the only librarian at GE’s corporate office in Fairfield, serving 500 individuals. There are other librarians in other divisions, but most of the extensive research work is outsourced. People come to Escarilla for information. “Of course people are in and out of this corporate office; but when they leave, they’re still calling me for information,” he added. “My name is out in the field. My response to a request for information is ‘be quick.’”

Most of the questions asked of Escarilla today are related to marketing. Some of the executives request articles about them from various magazines or newspapers. One of his more popular tasks is setting out articles about GE and its upper management for employees and visitors.

“The corporate librarian must understand the company’s ongoing business concerns and its current initiatives,” Escarilla said about the value of corporate librarianship. “At GE, for example, there are six major businesses and many sub-businesses. And many changes have occurred during my 21 years with the company. My research skills have always had extra value, because I completely knew and understood the company’s business needs.

“Technology has changed immensely. The delivery of information is unbelievable. I remember when I had to photocopy and mail or fax. Now, I just scan and e-mail. We have e-magazines, e-newspapers, e-books; everything is available online. My role as a corporate librarian has expanded from research to coordination and marketing of information services. I encourage employees to be self-sufficient in their own research projects and direct them to databases GE has contracts with.”

Escarilla has been a member of SLA since 1976.

His schedule hasn’t permitted leadership roles in chapters or divisions: In addition to his position at GE, he also has worked two evenings a week at the Fairfield University Library for 26 -years. At one point, he was working seven days a week, but had to cut back for his extracurricular activities, such as marathon running.

His goal is run in 100 marathons in his lifetime. His personal best time was 3:47 a few years ago in a marathon in Paris. His trans-Atlantic flight had arrived the same day. “My favorite marathons are New York City and Paris. I run those marathons every year.”

But he always made time for the annual conferences of SLA, which he has been attending for more than 20 years. “I always have a great time learning new technologies or developments processes but most important is to network with my old and new colleagues.” Escarilla believes he’ll remain with the organization as a retired member. “I love going to the conferences and meeting the people, seeing old friends. I also spend more time with many first-timers at the conference. They are my targets now,” he added, with a laugh.

“If you have seen Jose at an annual conference, then you know that his conference style is casual, but that’s deceiving,” said SLA member Jill Hurst-Wahl. “Jose takes the profession very seriously. He believes in librarianship as a career and wants people to succeed in their library-related careers. The best part about Jose is that he is always encouraging, whether you’ve known him for years or just meet him in the Info-Expo.”

SLA member Widharto concurs with that assessment. The Indonesian information professional at SEAMEO BIOTROP said that Escarilla is “a kind-hearted person and a disciplined man. He cares and is helpful for those who should be assisted.” They first met in 2005 in Toronto and their friendship has grown since.

“Jose is very accommodating,” said SLA member and Filipino Librarian Von Totanes. “When he found out that I was attending this year’s conference in Baltimore, he told me that I could join him in his hotel room if I didn’t have any place to stay.” The two first met at the conference in Toronto; since then, they met again in early 2006 when Escarilla returned to Philippines to visit family. Their relationship has been built via e-mail.

So much lies ahead for Escarilla in his future. But what of his profession? He predicts corporate librarians will always remain in demand. “With so many new products and new technologies, the corporate librarian will be needed to provide information on the best sources to serve various customers within the company. I advise librarians to attend all company activities and introduce themselves to employees and managers. They should aggressively promote the library’s services to everyone in the company.”

And he continues to believe that technology will continue to make the information specialist productive. “I know where to refer people if I don’t have the answer. The key to librarianship is to find the information wherever it is.”

But come December 22, he will face a new set of challenges. Retirement and leisure won’t be downtime for Escarilla. He plans to play a game of tennis with his 30-year-old son. He’s still trying to decide if he’ll travel to Latin America first in 2007 or do a road trip across the U.S. to visit friends and family. And he hopes to keep in touch with his SLA friends and colleagues.

“I can’t wait for my retirement,” Escarilla said. “I have to release all that energy within myself for good causes, and I am blessed with good health, body, and mind.”

And if a beaming Filipino-American in his early 60s stops to say hello, it’s probably Escarilla on his world tour.

Forrest Glenn Spencer is a Virginia-based independent information professional, editor, and writer. He specializes in developing potential donor prospects for non-profit organizations and works with clients as an Independent Collector of Fine Researched Information.


Jose Escarilla’s Advice to Info Pros

1. Treat everybody the same. Of course, you have to do extra, extra steps when an executive requests information.

2. Have a sense of humor. You can be serious, but you need to inject some kind of humor into it.

3. Have a smiling face whenever you see a client. It means that you are welcoming them with an open arm and willing to help them.

4. Know what other employees do in the organization and talk to them in person. You will need this in the future for referral purposes.

5. Talk to your manager on how important it is to attend SLA meetings for networking, professional development, and information on new products.

6. Go the extra mile to complete the work: Deliver the information in person or e-mail the information in minutes. In other words, get the information quickly and efficiently.

7. Make friends with other local librarians...just not special libraries but also academic and public librarians. You will need them during crunch time.

8. Always willing to take the job no matter difficult it is but be honest if you can’t do the job. Otherwise, give them an alternative.


Category: Librarians

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FO: Zsazsa Zaturnnah



Zsazsa Zaturnnah is the first Filipino comic book character to transcend his/her roots in a long time to become a pop culture force to be reckoned with. Check out the following links:

Comic book

Ang Kagila-gilalas na Pakikipagsapalaran ni Zsazsa Zaturnnah (The Amazing Adventures of Zsazsa Zaturnnah) started it all. Learn more about the book, download wallpapers, read preview pages and an interview with the author.
Carlo Vergara
Zsazsa's creator has a blog. Find out what makes him tick and what ticks him off.
Musical
Tanghalang Pilipino added actors, songs, sets and costumes to the mix. The site is not about Zsazsa, but you can monitor it to find out when the next performances will be. Read the review by Gibbs Cadiz, too.
Movie
The trailer above is for the movie that will start its run on 25 December 2006. The website doesn't seem to be working, but maybe it's just not optimized for Firefox. Watch the making-of video on YouTube.
Fans
There wouldn't be a musical or a movie without them. Multiply hosts the fans who participate in the forums and blog, and post photos and reviews. They even know that there's an official Zsazsa website that's under construction.

Categories: Filipiniana Online, Books and Movies

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FO: Hangad's "Magnificat"


Ang Puso Ko'y Nagpupuri (Magnificat)
Based on Luke 1:39-55
Lyrics and music by: Eduardo Hontiveros, SJ
Performed by: Hangad
Lyrics | Audio sample (ram)

This video moved me to post the following on Hangad's online forum more than two years ago:
hi! i just saw most of the video recently. i had seen the video before but only catching the last 30 seconds or so. i noted the blue and white motif and the jumping, but didn't quite get it even though i did like the video as a whole.

anyway, this time i saw it from the beginning (i think). and it got me thinking. the blue and white is obviously marian and, though i had to verify it in the bible, the jumping is a reference to john leaping in his mother's womb just before mary utters the magnificat. but there's obviously more to it than just john's prenatal leap because of all the shots of planes, trains and automobiles. my best guess is that it has something to do with infecting others with god's love. evidence? the last shot where the guy about to enter his car decides to forego the comfort of his own vehicle and run after the jumpers.

and i suppose this has something to do with what i liked best about the video--that it takes an old song with all the baggage of something that tends to be sung as if at a funeral and reminds viewers that the song is about JOY. who wants to join people who are so burdened by guilt (and boredom and apathy?) that they sing "alleluia" and "santo" at mass as if somebody died? no wonder so many catholics are defecting to more joyful congregations. but i digress.

good job! and i hope you make many more that will remind christians that following christ is not JUST about suffering, that we are sustained through the suffering because of the JOY he brings.

Categories: Religion, Filipiniana Online

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Immaculate (Mis)Conception

Was it Mary or Jesus who was conceived on December 8, the feast of the Immaculate Conception? What's the difference between the celebrations on September 8 and December 8? For that matter, what's the difference between the feasts of the Annunciation and the Immaculate Conception?

If you're not sure, then you're not alone. There is a logic to the liturgical calendar that is not always explained in religion classes or even in Church. Most Catholics (should?) know that the liturgical year starts with Advent and ends with Easter. The rest of the year is known as "ordinary time," which also occurs between the feast of the Epiphany and Ash Wednesday, the start of Lent.

But there are other events that do not follow the Advent-to-Easter cycle. Like the feast of the Immaculate Conception. And the Annunciation. And Mary's birthday.

Part of the confusion arises, I believe, because the readings for those three events—primarily Luke's account of the Annunciation—are also read during the Advent season.

In fact, the feast of the Immaculate Conception takes place during Advent. So people tend to think that it's part of the preparation for the coming of Jesus Christ on Christmas day. Wrong.

Here's a list of the events mentioned above and the days on which they're celebrated:
March 25
September 8
December 8
December 25
- Annunciation
- Mary's birthday
- Immaculate Conception
- Jesus Christ's birthday
If that doesn't make the relationships between the events clear, that's because the events should not be viewed using the January-to-December cycle either.

But maybe it will make more sense if you look at it this way:
December 8
September 8

March 25
December 25
- Immaculate Conception
- Mary's birthday

- Annunciation
- Jesus Christ's birthday
If you still can't see the relationships, try counting the months between the dates =)

But if you already knew that the birthdates of Mary and Jesus Christ were set exactly nine months after the dates they were conceived, then maybe you'll want to take a look at "Ineffabilis Deus," the papal encyclical that defined the teaching on the Immaculate Conception.


Categories: Religion, Events

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Ambeth Ocampo on Doctrina Christiana

Another interesting link recommended by a blogger brings you to the US Library of Congress and allows you to flip through a digital copy of the first book printed in the Philippines, the “Doctrina Cristiana” of 1593.

—"Time capsules" by Ambeth Ocampo (Philippine Daily Inquirer, 1 December 2006)
If you happened to read Ambeth Ocampo's column last week and wondered how you could find the "digital copy" of the Doctrina Cristiana he was referring to, he was actually referring to my post entitled "FO: Doctrina Christiana."

Did you try looking for the digital book using a search engine? Well, as I wrote in that post, "Not everything shows up on search engines" =)

And even if you tried looking for it using the Library of Congress catalog, unless you knew exactly how to use the catalog and what you were looking for, it would still be difficult to find the book. So if you'd like to tell other people how to find it, just tell them to search "filipino librarian doctrina."

Category: Filipiniana Online

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More Support for Library Hub

House Deputy Majority Leader Eduardo Gullas said the “warehouse-type large-volume libraries” for the public-school system will go a long way to improve basic education and strengthen English language skills among students.

—"Gullas makes a pitch for P1.5-B library hubs" by Miguel Antonio de Guzman (Manila Times, 4 December 2006)
This is good news, of course, but the fact that we're getting "praise" releases, instead of hard news, makes me uncomfortable. And, unlike the last press release, this one is not identified as such.

Category: Libraries—Public Schools

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Pinoy Top Blogs: November 2006

The biggest news this time is that total readership for the Top 50 Pinoy Top Blogs (PTB) went up by more than 100 percent from the October 2006 figures. I had to check my computations when I saw the figures, but they're correct. I also considered that, perhaps, the fact that data for October wasn't complete (i.e., due to downtimes) had something to do with it. Well, total unique hits (UH) went up by almost 50 percent from June 2006 figures.

Maybe it had something to do with Manny Pacquiao, but something's definitely up. Since June 2006, the 50th blog usually had UH of about 4,000 to 5,000 plus. But the UH of the lowest-ranked blog in the Top 50 this month is at 10,000. So it wasn't just the highest-ranked blogs that brought in the readers. Could it be that the Pinoy blogosphere has finally become a preferred "news" source?

Anyway, the Bryanboy controversy—not to mention his wins at the Gay Bloggies—probably contributed to the rise in total UH. But could the call for a boycott have led to Bryanboy's sliding down to 3rd? Not likely. As I've long suspected, most of his readers are not from the Philippines.

It's also very likely that Alleba Blog, which got Dugg and came out of nowhere to land on the 12th spot, contributed more than just a few non-regular readers to the mix. But let's see whether it will be more successful than other Digg- or media-driven "ascensions" at retaining its newly-gained spot.

Other big gainers in the past month were Kiven (did you know he's a librarian?), who climbed to 7 from 17; Putanginamo.com (the phrase exists, get used to it), which went to 27 from outside the Top 50; and textmates (from 46 to 29), which like the previous blog seems to be another of the optimized-from-birth blogs that have been moving up PTB in the past months.

Blogs that have left me scratching my head are eRadioportal, which doesn't seem to be an SEO trap, but doesn't seem to have gone up to the 2nd spot relying on content either; DZRH Blog, which came out of nowhere last October to take the 11th spot, but has now gone back to where it came from; and Composed Gentleman, which was at 24 last September, dropped out of the Top 50 in October, and is now back at 35. The swings of the last two blogs are too extreme. If you have any theories, let me know.

The following are the raw data as of 29 November 2006:



OC

1
6
2
3
4
7
17
9
10
14
16
-
20
15
8
21
22
13
12
19
5
32
24
18
23
25
-
27
46
33
26
29
35
30
-
36
28
48
-
43
-
-
31
34
37
39
45
-
-
49


NO

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50


NAME OF BLOG

Rickey
eRadioportal Blog
Bryanboy: Le Superstar Fabuleux
Motorcycle Philippines
Pinoy Cook
Mukamo
Kiven
Retzwerx - Ang Inyong Pinoy Big Blogger
Starmometer
pinoy.rickey.org
Philippines For Men
Alleba Blog
Our Awesome Planet
Pinoy Tech Blog
SELaplana
Blogged
Cellphone9
Inside PCIJ: Stories behind our stories
Basang Panaginip
Chikadora
laurganism.com
Now What, Ca t?
Leon Kilat: The Cybercafe Experiments
Pinoy BSN
Quezon.ph
Photojunkie
Putanginamo.com
Ellen Tordesillas
textmates
EntrePinoy Atbp
Coconuter - Philippine Travelogue by a Nomad
GPCarreon
Touched by an Angel
Macalua.com
Composed Gentleman
Filipino Librarian
Kwentong Tambay
Skirmisher
Parenting-Weblog.com
The J Spot
Pinoypundit
Radioactive Adobo
Manila's Daily Grind
The Sunday Punch
Pinoy Travel Blog
WeddingsAtWork.com News Blog
Filipina Soul
Splasher
Straight From The Doc
The Man Blog

TOTAL
UH

182,563
151,577
144,549
97,315
77,709
75,319
68,865
50,853
47,250
41,489
40,966
40,832
35,414
34,113
33,996
33,237
30,334
29,323
29,278
29,207
29,087
25,368
22,440
21,028
20,566
19,942
19,350
18,911
17,044
17,028
16,103
15,991
15,763
15,717
14,689
14,674
13,629
13,145
12,706
12,100
11,919
11,612
11,487
11,463
11,387
10,970
10,607
10,505
10,489
10,378

1,740,287
TMH

380,347
220,858
311,318
164,624
299,094
214,794
246,671
94,521
124,713
95,602
175,521
50,177
87,655
64,358
64,153
50,284
40,668
47,442
75,888
67,577
70,575
49,614
32,550
40,193
43,900
35,358
42,390
72,569
43,715
61,645
96,518
30,280
27,432
25,308
21,927
24,810
27,871
23,961
18,912
20,079
19,141
15,454
17,965
43,271
27,867
21,462
17,419
21,743
15,599
32,457

3,918,250

Category: Blogging

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LLE 2006: Results

Updated 9 January 2007: The links to Philippine Star and Manila Bulletin are dead, but the one for Manila Standard Today is now working properly.

Updated 4 December 2006: The complete press release from PRC, including top 3 schools, top 13 examinees, performance of schools in alphabetical order and the roll of successful examinees is now available via INQ7.net. The list of those granted registration without examination is also available.
Congratulations to the new librarians!

The passing rate has gone up significantly to 37 percent from last year's 31 percent. Below are the list of the top 13 examinees and the roll of successful examinees. If you're one of the new librarians, you may want to check out Job Openings and Career Development =)

Philippine Star has the complete list of successful examinees, while the top 13 may be found on the new PLAI-NCR Council Newsletter. Manila Bulletin has the press release, but no list. Manila Standard Today has a link, but there's nothing there yet. And Philippine Daily Inquirer and Manila Times have nothing at all at this time. If you'd like to see what else comes out in the newspapers, take a look at Google News every now and then.

It says a lot about the Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) that newspapers and blogs are the ones spreading the news. Its News & Events page has not been updated since June 19 (because of the nursing controversy?), and the Board for Librarians page indicates that Perla Garcia is still the chair, instead of Corazon Nera. Needless to say, don't go to the PRC website for the latest results.


Top 13
Florbella Sedillo Bongalos, 86.00
Maria Cristina Tomboc Nabaunag, 86.00
Maria Rowena Sapon Romero, 85.75
Gladys Joy Enriquez Entico, 85.40
Eugene Jose Toledo Espinoza, 85.15
Brian Aljer Bravo Coballes, 85.10
Angeline Gilera Alcayde, 85.00
Mark Christian Abel Juan, 84.80
Michel Addun Pinto, 84.70
Arlyn Campos Selga, 84.70
Clarivic Peña Dominguez, 84.55
Janice Gumiran Ammugauan, 84.50
Rosemarie Dorotayo Balidoy, 84.50

Successful Examinees
ABRIGO, VINCENT MIRANDA
ACUZAR, LORLYN SANDOVAL
AGREDA, RUBY LYN LEAL
ALCAYDE, ANGELINE GILERA
ALEGRE, VALERIE FAYE ESCOTO
ALIS, IRENE SACPA
AMMUGAUAN, JANICE GUMIRAN
AMOROSO, MARITES DELCO
AMURAO, NINDA FERRANCULLO
ANDAO, RHEA ANN PARANGUE
ANG, AILEEN MONSERATE
ANITO, MARY EILEEN LIMBAGA
ANUD, MARIO JR ALIVIO
APACIBLE, ROY DELA ROSA
AQUINO, DINA DELA CRUZ
ARAOJO, ABIGAEL MANIEGO
ARMENDEZ, NENITA NONAY
ARRIESGADO, JELICO ANGELO VERGARA
ASPREC, MARY ANN SISON
ATAYAN, DOROTHY JUANICO
AUMAN, DELIA EMENIDO
AUSTRIA, ROSEMARIE HERMANO
AYALA, ANNA RUTH ADRIANO
AYLES, ERLINDA GABON
BACATAN, JULIUS TRASES
BACUD, EVELYN OSTONAL
BADILLO, NIELS IAN CASTILLO
BAJENTING, MABELL RESNERA
BALARES, ALMYRA BISUÑA
BALIDOY, ROSEMARIE DOROTAYO
BALLESTEROS, GLOUDETTE BITAGUN
BALUCAN, SANDY TUMALA
BANERA, MELINDA TORRES
BANGA, LYN IDJAO
BANGENG, SANITA TUNDAGUI
BANSIG, ANN GRACE BAGACAY
BARRANCO, LORENA INGADA
BASALIO, MARITA RUFINO
BATUCAN, AILEN ALMAJOSE
BAUTISTA, DENNIS MANGILA
BAYLON, JENNIFER BANES
BELIRAN, JOAN MONTERO
BERLANDINO, ANN MARIE PERALTA
BERMAS, RODOLFO LASCANO
BERNALDEZ, GRACE BUENAVENTURA
BERNALES, JAN-ERROL CUADRO
BERNARDO, JULIE ANN IGNACIO
BERUNIO, MINA FLOR LOQUEZ
BERZO, DORANA GAYACAO
BIALEN, DIANESA TAPAR
BITAYAN, LUNCIA TINGBAWEN
BITOS, JENIPHER CABARDO
BONALOS, MARICHU MALABO
BONGALOS, FLORBELLA SEDILLO
BORRO, RIZALYN LIAGOSO
BRANDES, MAY ANN NATOR
BUCAO, DALIA CERA
BUENAFLOR, ROLELYN JASTILLANO
BULAGAO, JINGLE PAGSUGUIRON
CAB, NHYRMA FE ARANGCON
CABANDO, JUNE CARMILLE TEJAM
CABAÑA, MAE ANN MENDOZA
CABRIA, JEAN BORAIS
CAGAS, RAFAEL JR JUSON
CALBAR, GEONALYN SALUTA
CALI, HANAH BASAR
CALINGASAN, LOURDES FATIMA CHUNSIM
CALLEJA, CATHERINE HATCHAZO
CALUNSAG, ISAVAL MAE ITAO
CAMBA, RICELINA MAMUCOD
CAMPOSO, JOAN SIRICA VALERO
CANANG, CINDY MARCOS
CANLAS, NENITA MERCADO
CANSANCIO, JANETTE BARBACENA
CAPARROS, MARIA GRACE ODOÑO
CARIAGA, HAZEL PIA AGARAN
CATAMORA, MARY CRISTY MELANIO
CAÑA, MERCY BRONSAL
CELERIO, MA RONA ALIMON
COBALLES, BRIAN ALJER BRAVO
COBARIA, EVELYN BUNAG
COLBONGAN, IMACULADA CADDI
COLINIO, JEAN CAYAT
CONSTANTINO, IRVIN MERRILL GASPAR
CORDOVA, GLORY JEAN NIÑAL
CORPUZ, EDUARDO QUIJANO
CORTES, RONALYN AVILA
CORTEZ, JHAYSON SIMBULAN
CORTEZ, MYLENE GALLEON
CRUZ, DENISE MARIE FLORES
CRUZ, FLOCERFINA SAMSON
CRUZ, JENNIFER UMBAN
CRUZ, MARY DANIELLE FAJARDO
CRUZ, RUBY LYN GAVARAN
CUBITA, RICEL CUBITA
CUETO, QUIZA LYNN GRACE GENOBATEN
DACANAY, JANNET BARTOLEN
DAJORAY, SHIELA REYES
DANGUILAN, CATHERINE SORIANO
DAVID, JOSE ENRICO MIGUEL BONUS
DAWAL, BASILISA ACEBRON
DE CASTRO, YOLANDA ICACA
DE LEON, ERMINA MANIO
DE MESA, JANINE MARCELO
DEL MUNDO, EVELYN RECALDE
DEL MUNDO, RAFAEL JOSEPH CUADRA
DELA CRUZ, JEFFREY GUTIEREZ
DELGADO, EMELORNA ESTEBAN
DELOS REYES, SHERYL ALVAREZ
DIAZ, ANTONINO PUNSALAN
DOMASIG, ALVIN VILLAR
DOMINGUEZ, CLARIVIC PEÑA
DUEÑAS, MARIGOLD JESSICA CAÑELAS
DUQUE, RIZZA GARCIA
EJEM, CHANDRANI YVES ASUNCION
ELIARDA, DELIA PADILLA
EMPEMANO, JENIFER SANTOS
ENOC, ANALYN REGIDOR
ENTICO, GLADYS JOY ENRIQUEZ
ESCUDERO, YSOBEL COLUMBRES
ESPINOZA, EUGENE JOSE TOLEDO
ESTRADA, RACQUEL SIMON
FADEROGAYA, JENN MIÑANO
FARILLAS, MA CECILIA VILLASENOR
FERNANDEZ, ANGELO ERES
FERNANDEZ, JOSEFINA GALLAMOS
FLORES, MEGUMI SOL MANIQUIS
FLORO, RAMIL FELARCA
FRANCISCO, WEILYN GREGORIO
FRANCO, FILOTEO JR BALEJADO
FRANCO, MELANIE TENORIO
FUCHIGAMI, KAORI BUGTAI
FUENTES, TERESITA CALLANG
GABRIEL, JOCELYN ARCEO
GABRIEL, ROXANNE JIMENEZ
GALANG, MANUEL-LEANDRO JR MARCAIDA
GALVE, JENNY TANATE
GAMBITO, MARICAR FINANGAD
GANANCIAL, ZHENELE FAYE CAMPOS
GARCIA, VIRGINIA MEDRANO
GASINGAN, CYNTHIA DENESIA
GASPAR, YONIE BALLABA
GAVIEREZ, SHIELA MIE MACASANTOS
GEDULIAN, ARLENE TORREVERDE
GELMO, MUSTIOLA RESOMADERO
GO, NANCY OLORGA
GOKONG, JENIFFER ESEO
GOROSPE, BERNICE PANTALEON
GRAVITO, YOLANDA MAQUINIANA
GRIPO, ANALOU DUCLAN
GUADALQUIVER, MA CHRISTINA ANTERO
GUERRERO, FREDERICK MANGGA
GUTIERREZ, FLORENCE VENERANDA ORTIZ
GUTIERREZ, PAULINE STEPHANIE PASCUA
GUZON, ARLENE MORANO
HALCON, HAZEL AQUINO
HALIL, PARISA SAHID
HEMEDES, MARIA ELINOR FALLARIA
HERNANDO, MARIE JOY MUAÑA
HUPA, ALICIA ORBETA
IBARRA, VENUS PAGUIRIGAN
INFANTE, SHEENA MARIE MAGBANUA
IRINCO, REILA ANASOL ROBIS
ISRAEL, MARILYN CLAVERIA
JABICAN, JONALE ANN MANLAUNAN
JAROMAHUM, NIDA ALVEZO
JAURIGUE, RENECYNTH BABAN
JIMENEZ, ERYL DE LOS SANTOS
JOSON, CARMINA GADDI
JUAN, MARK CHRISTIAN ABEL
JUGADOR, CHESTER JETHRO CLINT PANES
JURIAL, SHENIEL BANAAG
LABESORES, JEAN DUYAN
LADAO, GENEVIE DIVINAGRACIA
LAGBO, EREZ JAMES ESCAYDE
LAMBAYAN, RUCHELL OLOR
LAMOSTE, MERAB AMPARO
LASTRA, MARIA GERALDINE GARCIA
LATURGO, FE MANO
LAZONA, MARITES REGALADO
LETRAN, ABIGAEL AMOR BACUD
LIBO, JOSIRYL GABAYERON
LUBIANO, LEAH CARILLO
LUDAN, CHIMINE GOLWINGON
LUMABAN, MA MAISHEL NAPOLITANO
MACABABAT, LANIE RADAZA
MACAUMBOS, JUMALYN CUIZON
MACAWILI, MELISSA ABIGAIL PILAR
MADEJA, MARIA LYN DE LUNA
MAGUDDAYAO, MA RIZALINA PELOVELLO
MAINIT, MELANY POTESTAS
MALENAB, JEANNE MARTINNE GOMEZ
MALIMAS, BRITZ TABIGUE
MANALILI, MARK CEL MAPA
MANALO, LEONA RICA TONGSON
MANUEL, LARRA SALONGA MAPA, DELILAH MENDONES
MARIANO, MARLON LOPEZ
MATRIMONIO, ANNA LIZA HUELAR
MELODIAS, LORD KNOWELL DUMAYAS
MENDEZ, NELFA RODINAS
MILITANTE, JEANITH DELFIN
MILLARE, JOHN NIGEL CORPUZ
MISLANG, MARY ANN JACINTA RAMOS
MOGOL, ARIEL SINGSING
MOLINA, JANICE CARIÑO
MONTEALTO, SHARON ANG
MONTEMAYOR, BRAZIL LAGMAY
MONTERO, FREDERIC VILLAR
MONTES, CHONA CASTILLO
MONTILLA, MICHELLE ANN TOLOSA
MUNAR, NYSIE BUYON
NABAUNAG, MARIA CRISTINA TOMBOC
NAVARRETE, DAN MARIE FABICON
NICDAO, SIENA BLANCA ALVAREZ
NICOLAS, MELVIN ASTROLOGO
NOGRALES, JAPHETT JUMAWAS
NUESCA, NIDA NACIS
OBLEFIAS, CHANTELLE MANCENIDO
OBUT, MECHEL DAGAPIOSO
OLEDAN, JOAN MALACA
OLENDO, RUDILYN ALEGRE
ONG, MANIELYN REYNES
ONG-ONGOWAN, FE MARTIN
OPINA, LEAN JOHN ALMAZAN
PADIOS, JEANETTE ONARIO
PAGAT, JANET PAGALA
PAJAC, MARIANNE DESCALLAR
PALACPAC, JOY MARICRIS CAYBOT
PANSACALA, RICHIE JACABAN
PASCUA, LAUREN ANN BARENG
PATAYAN, BERNADETTE BACDAY
PATRIARCA, MAIDIE APOSAGA
PAUYA, GENEVIVE REBURCIO
PELIT, RACHEL ANDRENO
PEREZ, MARIA AURORA CARDONA
PEREZ, MARIE GRACE BLANCO
PINOS, GINA LYN DIEGO
PINTO, MICHAEL ADDUN
RAMIREZ, MARY JANET MIGUEL
RAMOS, ALANA PURIFICACION GOROSPE
RAPADA, CELIAFLOR COSTUNA
REBADULLA, EVA COLANGAN
REYES, ADELA GARCIA
REYES, AUREA UNDAN
REYES, EMIE TENIZO
RILLON, JULIETA REYES
RIMANDO, VENESSA LEDESMA
RIVERA, TERESA MARRON
RIÑO, HELEN CAY
ROMERO, MARIA ROWENA SAPON
SABELINO, JOAN RESCALLAR
SACE, RITZ LAZARO
SAGADAL, ELENA LAS-AY
SALAZAR, MARICEL BESIN
SALEM, LUCY PAGHARI ON
SALUD, ANTONETTE SALVADOR
SALUDARES, LEILA BEZ
SAMSON, ANGELICA LIM
SANTOS, EFER JHAN MARGARETT CORILLA
SARILAMA, SINAB MACARIMBANG
SAYO, XAVIERA LYN GONZALES
SELGA, ARLYN CAMPOS
SEMION, NARIZA MERA
SERRANO, ROSITA PALANCA
SERVAÑEZ, MERLYN GATCHALIAN
SICAT, RUBIROSA VILANO
SILAWAN, GLENDA HIYAS
SITOY, WENELYN CALIMBO
SOLAS, MYLA BIONSON
SOLIVEN, ANIVEL LAURETA
SUHAYON, MAY GOMEZ
SUMALINOG, LEONITA CAIÑA
SUPERABLE, SUSAN LAGADO
TABANIAG, LORELIE TAPIA
TABLIZO, NOEME CAYABYAB
TABUGA, RENATO LEE
TAPAYA, ELMER LAGARIZA
TEJADA, ELOISA MARIANO
TENMATAY, TYRAN REX FERNANDEZ
TEOPE, VEVERLY SINAMBAN
TOLENTINO, MICHAEL JOHN MANUIT
TRINIDAD, SHIRLEY ESTEBAN
TUBIS, MAMERTO JR RAMOS
TUMULAC, MYRA CAMAGOS
UMALI, ASUNCION MERCADO
UY, ROSITA NOBLE
VALENCIA, EDNA CATIPON
VERGARA, MARVIN MENDOZA
VERIÑO, GINALYN ABELLO
VILLAFUERTE, JESSA NADELA
VILLANUEVA, CINDY SEBALDA
VILLANUEVA, MYRA ENTONA
VILLANUEVA, PILAR LIMEN
VILOAN, IRENE MILLENA
VISITACION, VANESSA BISMONTE
VISTAN, ALEJANDRO PANLILIO
VITANZOS, CHARLINE BALBOA
WOODEN, PRINCESS GRACE CABLOY
YAP, JOSEPH MARMOL
YAP, MARILYN BEQUIO
YU, JAKE CATHLEEN UY
YU, ROSE IMELDA GAPUZ

Category: Licensed Librarians

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Library Student Journal 1:2 (2006)

Library Student JournalThe second issue of Library Student Journal (LSJ) is out. If you don't have too much time, take a look at "A Cataloging Carol," a short story with illustrations that features "ghosts" named Ranganathan, Borges and Berman. And don't forget the footnotes! =)

The contents of LSJ's first issue include the following in both html and pdf versions:

Articles
Organization of Knowledge and the Hyperlink: Eco's The Name of the Rose and Borges' The Library of Babel
Seto, Iva
Poetry in children's literature: development of a genre
Dixon, Ann
Essays
A Cataloging Carol (fiction)
Larson, Leah Delia
Developing an Institutional Repository: an insider's look at the University of Utah IR
Mower, Allyson
Selection, deaccessioning, and the public image of information professionals: learning from the mistakes of the past
Netzer Wajda, Carrie
Editorials
A field for all: letter from the editor, November, 2006
Guinnee, Eli
Do we want a perfectly filtered world?
Cooke, Louise
Interview to interaction: towards a terminology of equality in reference work
Francis, Mary
Reviews
Administration of the public library (review)
Brust, Eric
The librarians career guidebook (review)
Hicks, Deborah

Disclosure: I'm a member of the Editorial Board.


Category: Technical Services

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